Call for papers

CFP: NANAS On-Line Symposium: Contested Language and the Study of Later Life

Although complexities surrounding how aging and later life are depicted, experienced, studied and “disciplined” are well known, albeit debated, the language we use to talk about age-related issues has received less attention. Yet, the ways scholars and researchers talk and write about old age can be fiercely contested for a variety of reasons including disciplinary conventions, cultural and/or historically embedded meaning, regional differences, and others.

In this two-day online symposium we want to create a space for careful considerations and constructive conversations about the central terminologies of age studies in the humanities.  We therefore invite abstract submissions for papers, workshops or themed panels that will take place from November 18-19 (times to be determined). We welcome presentations from interdisciplinary humanities and social sciences that engage with (but are not limited to) various topics related to contested language such as language related to the following:

  • Words such as elderly, elder, older, old, senior citizen
  • Gerontology, age studies
  • Successful aging, productive aging, active aging
  • Discursive framing of dementia (e.g., living with, suffering from)
  • Figurative language, including metaphors, idiomatic expressions, etc. (e.g. age as decline, burdened by age)
  • Gerontechnologies
  • Longevity

We will offer a prize of year’s membership in NANAS to the students, graduate students or emerging scholars who author and present the three best papers. Papers should be 10 minutes long and should address some aspect of contested language in research, practice, or performance.

Please send a 300-500 word presentation proposal and a brief biological note to Kate de Medeiros, demedekb@miamiOH.edu, by August 15, 2021.

Please contact Kate with any questions.




Welcome to the NANAS website!


NANAS’s ongoing mission is to facilitate sustainable interdisciplinary collaborations and methodologies that bridge the medical and social sciences and the humanities, supporting research that increases understandings of the cultural meanings of the aging processes across the lifespan in order to challenge stereotypes and provide creative approaches that improve the health, care, and quality of life for people aging into old age.

We are working to provide the latest information regarding events, publications, and emerging ideas in the network of aging studies. If you see something that is not working properly, please email info@agingstudies.org. Thank you, and we hope that your experience is superb.


Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Slider image
Print Friendly, PDF & Email